Archive for the ‘Rep. Trebor Worthen’ Category

Term Limits Issue One Step Away From Ballot

April 17, 2008

Oklahomans are just one legislative vote away from being able to vote this November on enacting term limits for statewide office holders, Oklahomans for Responsible Government (OFRG) said today.

By a 56-44 vote, the House approved Senate Bill 1987. The bill, which would allow voters this fall to decide whether to enact 12-year term limits for secondary statewide offices such as attorney general, state auditor and state schools superintendent, now goes to the full Senate for final consideration.

“Term limits ended the ‘good old boy’ system in the Oklahoma Legislature and allowed a new group of Republican and Democratic leaders to come to power. Those leaders ushered in much-needed reforms and policies that have helped to move the state forward,” said state Rep. Trebor Worthen (R-OKC), House sponsor of SB 1987. “I hope my colleagues in the Senate will give Oklahomans the chance to vote on this important issue. I thank OFRG for their hard work and dedication to seeing SB 1987 passed.”

OFRG Executive Director Curt Price said, “Today’s outcome is a victory for Oklahoma voters. This issue is overwhelmingly popular with voters. OFRG encourages the state Senate to follow the example of their House colleagues by giving Oklahoma voters a chance to express their voice on this important issue.”

Previously, SB 1987 passed the Senate 31-17, with seven Democrats joining their Republican colleagues in support of the bill. “With this important bill one step away from being on the November ballot, it is important senators don’t waiver in their support for SB 1987 the second time around. OFRG will continue to work to ensure that SB 1987 makes it to the ballot,” Price said.

A July 2007 Pulse Opinion Research survey of 1,000 likely voters found 77 percent of those surveyed would vote for a measure setting term limits for executive offices. A December 2007 poll by the Tulsa World and KOTV found 73 percent of those surveyed supported the idea of term limits for executive offices.

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I.D. May Soon be Required to Vote

March 11, 2008

OKLAHOMA CITY –Legislation protecting Oklahoma voters from fraud at the ballot box passed the House Monday.

House Bill 2956 would require voters to show photo identification before casting a ballot.

Rep. Sue Tibbs (R-Tulsa), author of the legislation, said the change is needed to prevent voter fraud and ensure only those eligible are voting:

We have to do everything we can to make sure every Oklahoman has confidence that their vote will count. There are people who don’t believe in our voting system anymore. This bill does not prevent anyone who is eligible to vote from casting a ballot.

If a voter does not have a photo ID when they show up to vote, the legislation allows an Oklahoman to cast a ballot if they sign a sworn statement swearing or affirming that they are the person identified on the official precinct registry.

Trebor Worthen (R-OKC):

A good number of Oklahomans lack confidence in our voting system and doubt that our process has integrity. We aren’t depriving anybody of the right to vote by passing this legislation, but we are instilling more confidence in the system.

The bill passed the House with a vote of 55-42 and will next be considered in the Senate.

Worthen Declines Re-election to Pursue Private Sector Career

March 3, 2008

OKLAHOMA CITY (March 3, 2008) — Oklahoma City Rep. Trebor Worthen said he has had enough time to accomplish his primary legislative goals and announced today that he will not be seeking re-election.

Rep. Worthen, now 28, was the youngest member of the House when elected in 2004. He replaced his father, Robert Worthen, who served in the state legislature for 18 years before being term-limited. Worthen:

I first ran for office because I wanted to have an impact on policy issues that affect the lives of every day Oklahomans. My primary goals were lowering taxes, enacting pro-life legislation, passing sweeping ethics reform, and keeping government spending in line. It has been an honor for me to have accomplished those goals with my colleagues in the legislature.

With his primary goals enacted into law, Worthen said it is time for him to focus on building his career in the private sector:

I never ran for office to be a career politician. I ran because I wanted to help enact conservative policies at the Capitol. Now it’s time for me to focus on advancing my career in the private sector.

Worthen said that Majority Designs, the marketing and consulting company he started last year, is demanding more of his time and will require his full attention if it is to continue growing. The company specializes in political advertising, and already has clients in four states and the District of Columbia.

Additionally, Worthen said he will be joining A.H. Strategies as a Senior Associate. A.H. Strategies is a leading political consulting company in Oklahoma, most known for its role in electing the Republican House majority and helping the Senate Republican Caucus grow to 24 members.

Despite his new role in the private sector, Worthen said he is not ruling out another run for office in the future. Worthen has eight years of eligible service in the Legislature under Oklahoma’s term limits provision.

John McCain’s 2008 Campaign Announces Oklahoma Coordinators

January 22, 2008

ARLINGTON, VA — U.S. Senator John McCain’s presidential campaign today announced new additions to its Oklahoma Leadership Team. Chad Alexander and State Representative Trebor Worthen will lead the growing grassroots organization on behalf of John McCain’s candidacy leading up to Oklahoma’s February 5th Primary. Alexander and Worthen join State Chairman, Oklahoma Senator Tom Coburn and Honorary State Chairman, Oklahoma Governor Frank Keating.

“There is no greater champion of fiscal responsibility and government reform than John McCain,” said Alexander. “John McCain’s conservative convictions and principled leadership are what our nation needs right now, and that’s why I am proud to back him for the Republican nomination.”

“I am honored to work for a man like Senator McCain whose integrity and character is unmatched. Oklahomans, like all Americans, will choose a President who has the experience to lead on day one, and John McCain is that man,” said Representative Worthen. Read more…

Rep. Worthen Call for Dems to Sign Pledge Cards

March 29, 2007

“Divisiveness destroys success, and too much is at stake for us to surrender to the pitfalls of partisanship. There is no glory in gridlock, but the rewards of working together – of joining forces on behalf of our fellow Oklahomans – are truly without limit.”

Gov. Brad Henry – 2007 State of the State Address

It seems Governor Henry’s Democratic colleagues in the legislature heeded his words until he bribed them Monday with a $100,000 fundraiser. Henry today used his line-item veto to strike down $6.8 billion in new state spending, saying legislative leaders employed a “flawed, closed-door process to craft a flawed budget product that did not represent the best interests of Oklahoma taxpayers.”

The governor is employing curious logic to say a bi-partisan budget agreement doesn’t “represent the best interests of the people,” especially in light of the current political climate where bi-partisanship is as rare as bull with udders! One would think 149 legislators would have some idea of what is in the best interest of the people. The governor’s chutzpah continues:

“I do not use my veto authority lightly…I had no other choice but to strike down the spending bill.”

Rep. Trebor Worthen (R-Oklahoma City), asked House Democrats yesterday to sign pledge cards committing their votes to uphold the agreement.

“House Democrats have formed their own gridlock gang to keep this responsible state budget package from becoming law. They need to quit playing games and throwing temper tantrums and commit to uphold this agreement.

The majority of House Democrats voted for this measure when it originally passed the House last week. Then they stood behind the governor today at his press conference, as if to say that they’re now against the agreement. The taxpayers of this state expect them to stand up for responsible government and not play partisan games.”

On Tuesday, the governor distributed his own pledge cards to House Democrats in an effort to gauge support for his efforts. Worthen said that by voting for HB 1234 originally, only to later threaten to help the governor veto it later, House Democrats are being dishonest and appear to just want to have the limelight thrust their way.

“Instead of offering constructive criticisms and trying to help find solutions to budgetquestions, House Democrats are standing in the way of a responsible state budget, just because they don’t feel like they had enough say in the process.

The worst part of it is, they are preventing state government from meeting the April 1 Fund Education First deadline. When we passed this budget bill last week, we met the deadline, but by vetoing this measure now, the governor and his gridlock gang of House Democrats are holding up funding for teachers and education.”

Rep. Worthen Calls Democratic Lawmaker’s Proposal "A Solution in Search of a Problem"

March 2, 2007

Statement from Rep. Trebor Worthen (R-Oklahoma City), Chairman of House Elections & Redistricting Subcommittee House Elections and Redistricting Subcommittee Chairman Trebor Worthen (R-Oklahoma City) issued the following statement in response to a redistricting commission proposal by Rep. Ryan McMullen (D-Burns Flat):

“Rep. McMullen’s proposal is a solution in search of a problem. Our current system of redistricting relies on elected lawmakers with a duty to represent all constituents. Rep. McMullen wants to strip that representation, and instead put it into the hands of unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats.

In fact, his proposal will make redistricting more partisan, not less, by giving both major party chairs a seat on the commission. Duly elected representatives of the people, not political parties, should have the authority to redraw legislative and congressional districts.

We already have a sound redistricting system that is based on core democratic principles. It has proven to be fair and effective in the past, and I see no reason to change it now.”

Rep. Worthen Calls Democratic Lawmaker’s Proposal "A Solution in Search of a Problem"

March 2, 2007

Statement from Rep. Trebor Worthen (R-Oklahoma City), Chairman of House Elections & Redistricting Subcommittee House Elections and Redistricting Subcommittee Chairman Trebor Worthen (R-Oklahoma City) issued the following statement in response to a redistricting commission proposal by Rep. Ryan McMullen (D-Burns Flat):

“Rep. McMullen’s proposal is a solution in search of a problem. Our current system of redistricting relies on elected lawmakers with a duty to represent all constituents. Rep. McMullen wants to strip that representation, and instead put it into the hands of unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats.

In fact, his proposal will make redistricting more partisan, not less, by giving both major party chairs a seat on the commission. Duly elected representatives of the people, not political parties, should have the authority to redraw legislative and congressional districts.

We already have a sound redistricting system that is based on core democratic principles. It has proven to be fair and effective in the past, and I see no reason to change it now.”