Archive for the ‘OK Bluenotes’ Category

More Kumbaya, Touchy Feely BS From ODP

May 16, 2007

“We hope to spread knowledge and create a greater since of tolerance” – ODP Chair Lisa Pryor

Chairman Pryor is still apparently not supervising or proof reading the interns work on the Blue Note Blog. The word is sense not since by they way. The above quote – with misspelled word and all – is taken from a post highlighting an “interdenominational faith service” the ODP is sponsoring this Sunday. Here’s an excerpt:

“It will bring together readings from the New Testament and the Koran, as well as Hebrew scripture and Buddhist prayer and meditation. There will also be live music and a reading from a Dr. Martin Luther King sermon.”

Just as we wrote awhile back, the Dems are the real masters of wedge politics, and this is just another prime example. We’re sure the good ‘ol boys in Little Dixie are thrilled about their party embracing Buddhist prayers and Koran readings!

Real Wedge Politics

May 7, 2007

Democrats are a funny breed. Their talking points for their operatives and politicians predictably always accuse Republicans of engaging in the focus group buzz term “wedge politics.”

If you are Republican, you’re engaging in wedge politics if you espouse the belief that the second amendment guarantees your right to own a firearm. To the Dems, you’re engaging in wedge politics if your faith is important to you in your public and private life, especially if you use it to try and appeal to those with similar beliefs. It’s wedge politics to declare that your faith dictates marriage should be between one man and one woman. It’s gotten so ridiculous, the Dems now accuse Republicans of using national security as a wedge issue, even though radical Muslims have declared a world wide Jihad against western civilization!

We believe a better definition of wedge politics is dividing people by their ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation, rather than by their particular beliefs. The Democrats have popularized and mainstreamed the Balkinization of America with the hyphenated American designation – African-Americans, Irish-Americans, German-Americans, etc. The Democratic base is traditionally comprised of special interest groups – teachers unions, Blacks, Hispanics, homosexuals, environmentalists, etc. It is not uncommon for Democrats to frighten these constituencies into believing that Republicans are going to take some right from them.

The OK Bluenote gives a blaring example today of “real” wedge politics.

Black women across America are meeting, mobilizing and empowering themselves as a critical voting bloc for the 2008 presidential election.

Three prominent civil rights organizations — the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, headed by Melanie L. Campbell; the National Council of Negro Women, chaired by veteran women’s and civil rights leader Dr. Dorothy I. Height, the A. Philip Randolph Institute, led by Clayola Brown — met in Washington D.C. and created the Power of the Sister Vote 2008 to lead a national debate about black women, the political process and the 2008 presidential election.

“Black women represent over 56 percent of the registered black electorate. In the 2004 presidential election, black women represented 58 percent of the total black vote,” Campbell said in a statement. “Our voices weigh heavily in our family’s civic engagement decisions.”

The Sister Vote 2008 meeting represents the first in a series to draw attention to black women and young voters. More than 30 national and state-based black women leaders and opinion makers attending a session last month where they were briefed on the 2008 Republican and Democratic National Committee political process.

Donna Brazile, a Democratic political consultant, said according to the 2004 Census Bureau, black women’s registration and turnout rates were 67.9 percent and 59.8 percent, both higher than the overall population figures (65.9 percent and 58.3 percent); according to the exit polls in 2004, black women were 7 percent of all voters.

“Black women are in a key position to help shape the debate and outcome of the 2008 presidential race,” Brazile told BlackAmericaWeb.com last week. Read more…

Jesse L Jackson Coming to Oklahoma This Week

March 28, 2007

Jesses roadshowFrom OK Blue Notes:

Rev. Jesse Jackson will be the guest speaker for the Ninth Episcopal District Spring Convocation. The event will take place at the Sheration Midwest City Reed Conference Center, Wednesday, March 28-Saturday, March 31, 2007. 5800 Will Rogers Road Midwest City, OK . The theme for the occassion is; “From Good to Great – The Jesus Challenge: Building Leaders for Today and Tomorrow”

Reading, Writing, ‘Rithmetic

February 27, 2007

ODP Chair Lisa Pryor wrote yesterday on OKBluenotes that if you can read her post on HB 1935, the “Honesty in Funding Education Act,” you should “thank a teacher.”

It is ironic to us that a day later, one of the most poorly written pieces we’ve ever seen on the site was submitted on behalf of Black History Month. In between the run on sentences, poor punctuation, and words that simply don’t belong in context to the sentences, try and interpret this:

BLACK WALL STREET”
“A Dream Lost”

“A little- known chapter of African-American history in Oklahoma as told to Ronald E. Childs. If anyone truly believes that Columbine High School massacre or the on the Federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was the most tragic bombing ever to take place on United States soil as the media has been widely reporting, they’re wrong plain and simple. That’s because an even deadlier bomb occurred in the same state to forget that it ever happened…”

We praised them last week for waiting 14 days to race bait and pander to African American Oklahomans during Black History Month. We guess they wanted to get one more race baiting post on the site before the end of the month.

Reading, Writing, ‘Rithmetic

February 27, 2007

ODP Chair Lisa Pryor wrote yesterday on OKBluenotes that if you can read her post on HB 1935, the “Honesty in Funding Education Act,” you should “thank a teacher.”

It is ironic to us that a day later, one of the most poorly written pieces we’ve ever seen on the site was submitted on behalf of Black History Month. In between the run on sentences, poor punctuation, and words that simply don’t belong in context to the sentences, try and interpret this:

BLACK WALL STREET”
“A Dream Lost”

“A little- known chapter of African-American history in Oklahoma as told to Ronald E. Childs. If anyone truly believes that Columbine High School massacre or the on the Federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was the most tragic bombing ever to take place on United States soil as the media has been widely reporting, they’re wrong plain and simple. That’s because an even deadlier bomb occurred in the same state to forget that it ever happened…”

We praised them last week for waiting 14 days to race bait and pander to African American Oklahomans during Black History Month. We guess they wanted to get one more race baiting post on the site before the end of the month.

Lawmakers & Operatives Spin Death of Governor’s Pre-K Program for 3-Year-Olds

February 22, 2007

Gov. Brad Henry’s controversial plan to create a state-funded pre-kindergarten program for three-year-olds is dead for the next two years following a tie vote in the Oklahoma Senate Appropriations Committee.

The bill, SB 518, died on an 8 to 8 vote Wednesday. Under the Senate’s new power-sharing agreement, a bill receiving a tie vote on “final action” in a committee is dead for the next two years.

Senate Co-President Pro Tempore Glenn Coffee said the bill’s defeat does not signal the end of bipartisanship in the evenly divided Senate. It is just an example of a policy difference between the two parties on a specific proposal.

“I am proud of the eight members of the Appropriations Committee who took this brave stand and said our state should not commit to this expansion of government at a time when we are facing a tight budget,” stated Coffee, R-Oklahoma City. “But Senate Republicans continue to look forward to working with Gov. Henry on areas where we can find common ground, like fixing the Teacher Retirement System.”

Coffee said there is also significant division among early childhood education advocates about whether Henry’s plan is an effective one.

Democrats obviously had different views on the defeat of the bill.

Governor Henry said The vote amounted to “pure politics”. “Republicans caucused right before this bill, whipped everybody into shape and came back and voted lockstep against the bill.”

Treasurer Scott Meacham said that scientific research on the benefits of enhancing brain development during the early childhood years is unanimous. “Most development occurs before age 3, then slows by age 5, Meacham said. “Making an investment during the formative years can pay big dividends on down the road, when students are learning academic skills,” he said.

“I would urge you to put aside your partisan rhetoric,” said Sen. Susan Paddack, D-Ada, the bill’s author.

ODP Chair Lisa Pryor wrote in her morning rant” this morning:

“Yesterday all eight GOP members of the Senate Appropriations Committee voted against Oklahoma’s families and three-year olds.”

We love bi-partisanship.

RELATED:

OKLAHOMA City (AP) A bill to expand the number of Oklahoma children that qualify for Medicaid benefits passes the Senate Rules Committee today.

Cheap & Patronizing

February 14, 2007

Chairman Pryor has apparently given wide discretion to the new interns when it comes to posting on the official ODP blog, OK Blue Notes. In a seres of “Black History” posts this month, the blog has celebrated the history, accomplishments, and contributions of African Americans to this country. We give them credit for celebrating our history and also waiting 14 days into the month to pander and race bait with a patronizing picture and post on slavery.

Chairman Pryor, we wonder when the below slave ship picture was taken, since the slave trade in the United States was outlawed in 1808, and the first photographic image was created in 1820?

According to Wikipedia:

Through the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 (also known as the Freedom Ordinance) under the Continental Congress, slavery was prohibited in the territories north of the Ohio River. In the East, though, slavery was not abolished until later. The importation of slaves into the United States was banned on January 1, 1808; but not the internal slave trade, or involvement in the international slave trade externally.

The first photograph was an image produced in the 1820s by the French inventor Nicéphore Niépce on a polished pewter plate covered with a petroleum derivative called bitumen of Judea. Produced with a camera, the image required an eight-hour exposure in bright sunshine. Niépce then began experimenting with silver compounds based on a Johann Heinrich Schultz discovery in 1724 that a silver and chalk mixture darkens when exposed to light.

Chairman Pryor, you may want to devote more time to supervising the new interns instead of trying to score points on the radio to later post on the ODP blog.

From OK Blue Notes:

Least we forget….

‘The absence of a permanent memorial to commemorate the lives of the millions of lives lost to the slave trade needs to be addressed’

–The Most Revd Dr John Sentamu, Archbishop of York.

2007 Bicentenary

It is 200 years since Parliament passed the Act to abolish the slave trade in the British Empire – the start of a long road to abolition. The slave trade was a profoundly inhuman enterprise and the bicentenary provides us with an opportunity to express our sorrow that it happened.

It also enables us to remember those who suffered and who campaigned for abolition, and to re-double our efforts to address the legacy of the slave trade and to tackle injustice in the world today.

2007 Bicentenary of the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act: Calendar of Events.