Archive for the ‘Cherokee Nation’ Category

Tribes Want to Charter Schools, Facing Challenges

February 14, 2008

The Cherokees and Chickasaws would like to be able to charter schools, to be able to teach in their language, and around their traditional culture.

NewsOK.com is reporting:

Charter schools could expand again if a bill passed out of the Senate Education Committee on Monday survives this legislative session.

Sen. Glenn Coffee, R-Oklahoma City and co-president pro tempore, proposed a bill that would allow federally recognized American Indian tribes to sponsor charter schools.

Last session, legislators approved a measure allowing universities to do the same. But attempts to encourage more charters are taking place under the weight of a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the original law.

KSWO in Lawton quotes Sen. Coffee:

…[E]xpanding the number of groups that can set up charter schools will give parents more educational choices for their children.

To be effective for the Cherokee nation, the legislation would need to be expanded to include Tahleqhah, becuase the Cherokees do not have the resources to work with the Tulsa Public Schools on this at this time.

(Also see: Indianz.com)

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Email To City Workers From Kathy Taylor

December 5, 2007

Greetings!

I want to take a moment to update you on the progress of the BOK Center.

The arena is in its 27th month of a 36-month construction schedule. The installation of glass and steel panels are being added, along with other tasks being completed by the hundreds of workers on site. Exciting developmenets are happening everyday to the structure and there are many more to come that will contribute to the success of this new point of pride for Tulsa. With the recent sellout of the ONEOK Club Seats and the huge success of the sale of tickets for the Celine Dion concert, we are already starting to experience the great potential for Tulsa to draw new tourism visitors – not just from Oklahoma, but from the entire region.

Just over the past few weeks I was pleased to announce some exciting new private sponsorships for the BOK Center.

– Today, the Oklahoma Ford Dealers committed to a 15-year Founder partnership by sponsoring two suites. Ford will also serve as the official automotive sponsor for the BOK Center. In total, the commitment from the Oklahoma Ford Dealers is $4.9 million.
– ONEOK has committed to at 15-year commitment totaling more than $5 million dollars for the naming rights to the premium seating level, club lounge, blue seating program, and for a founders suite and lounge box.
– Williams Company has committed to a 20-year commitment of more than $5 million dollars to help pay for the center-hung scoreboard, the sponsorship of sports event replays, and a founder suite.
– Cherokee Nation Enterprises has committed 10 years with a commitment of $2.3 million to a founder’s suite and the arena’s exclusive casino and destination resort.
– Cox Communications has committed a 10-year commitment totaling over $2.5 million for the arena’s official telecommunications provider.

These sponsorships represent another chapter in our public/private partnerships that we have formed to make this great building a
success. They are helping to enhance the funding commitment made by Tulsa citizens and help to leverage our public investment from Vision 2025.

Finally, I wanted to remind you that Tulsa’s own 66ers tip off their first home game tonight at 7 p.m. in the Expo Square Pavilion. If you and your family and friends need more information or to purchase tickets, just call 585-8444.

Please have a very safe and enjoyable weekend, and as always, thank you for all you do to make Tulsa such a great place to live!

Sincerely,

Kathy Taylor

Mayor

Area tribes will receive $5.5 million in tribal grants

October 8, 2007

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Congressman Dan Boren announced Thursday the award of $5,546,943 in community development grants to seven tribes in eastern Oklahoma. The Indian Community Development Block Grants (ICDBG) are administered by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The United Keetoowah Band of Cherokees and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma each will receive $800,000.

The funding will be used for the development of viable Native American communities, including decent housing, a suitable living environment and economic opportunities for low- and moderate-income families.

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OK Rep delays Cherokee cuts

September 17, 2007

U.S. Rep. Dan Boren did the correct thing in convincing the House to hold off cutting Cherokee Nation funds until freedmen lawsuits are resolved.

Earlier this month, the U.S. House voted to eliminate the federal funding to Cherokees that normally would be included in the housing assistance bill. But Boren pushed through an amendment allowing the funding to continue while federal courts hear the freedmen suits.

The Cherokee housing funding amounts to about $30 million, 10 percent of the annual federal funding for the Cherokee Nation.

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Council confirms chief’s nominees for cabinet, court

September 12, 2007

Newly seated Cherokee Nation tribal councilors did not shy away from debate during their first regular council meeting held Monday night. Chuck Hoskin Jr. was one of five councilors opposing the nomination of Troy Wayne Poteet to the tribe’s Supreme Court, saying although he approved of the man, he could not approve the nominee.

“I have reservations concerning Mr. Poteet’s nomination to the court,” he said. “He has an extensive background in history, but I’m concerned he has only a handful years’ experience in the law, and no experience practicing in front of the court of our nation.”

Hoskin, an attorney with similar law experience, said he personally would not pursue a court appointment until he felt he had ample experience to properly represent the Cherokee citizens, and he believes Poteet should be treated in the same way.

Hoskin fills the seat left open by his father, Chuck Hoskin Sr., who is serving in the Oklahoma House of Representatives.

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Council confirms chief’s nominees for cabinet, court

September 12, 2007

Newly seated Cherokee Nation tribal councilors did not shy away from debate during their first regular council meeting held Monday night. Chuck Hoskin Jr. was one of five councilors opposing the nomination of Troy Wayne Poteet to the tribe’s Supreme Court, saying although he approved of the man, he could not approve the nominee.

“I have reservations concerning Mr. Poteet’s nomination to the court,” he said. “He has an extensive background in history, but I’m concerned he has only a handful years’ experience in the law, and no experience practicing in front of the court of our nation.”

Hoskin, an attorney with similar law experience, said he personally would not pursue a court appointment until he felt he had ample experience to properly represent the Cherokee citizens, and he believes Poteet should be treated in the same way.

Hoskin fills the seat left open by his father, Chuck Hoskin Sr., who is serving in the Oklahoma House of Representatives.

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Congressman Boren delivers bad news to Cherokee Nation, What Boren Can’t Do For You

September 10, 2007

The controversy over the Cherokee Nation‘s vote to exclude some descendants of slaves from tribal membership made it to the floor of the U.S. House on Thursday, and a last-minute compromise saved the tribe from potentially losing millions of dollars in housing aid.

Rep. Dan Boren, D-Muskogee, brokered the deal with Rep. Melvin Watt, D-N.C., to allow the tribe to continue receiving federal housing assistance as long as the tribal court is deciding the validity of the vote to exclude Cherokee freedmen from the tribe.

However, if the tribal court ultimately rules the vote in March was valid, the tribe could lose the assistance, which has averaged about $33 million a year, Boren said.

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Congressman Boren delivers bad news to Cherokee Nation, What Boren Can’t Do For You

September 10, 2007

The controversy over the Cherokee Nation‘s vote to exclude some descendants of slaves from tribal membership made it to the floor of the U.S. House on Thursday, and a last-minute compromise saved the tribe from potentially losing millions of dollars in housing aid.

Rep. Dan Boren, D-Muskogee, brokered the deal with Rep. Melvin Watt, D-N.C., to allow the tribe to continue receiving federal housing assistance as long as the tribal court is deciding the validity of the vote to exclude Cherokee freedmen from the tribe.

However, if the tribal court ultimately rules the vote in March was valid, the tribe could lose the assistance, which has averaged about $33 million a year, Boren said.

Read More

Seven Reasons Why You Should Care About the Cherokee Tribal Elections

June 15, 2007

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from The Local Crank. He is a Cherokee, a lawyer, and a Stacy Leeds supporter. You can usually catch him at his site.

1) Judge Stacy Leeds is a progressive candidate with a plan to diversify the tribal economy (ending its current dependence on Federal hand-outs and casino revenues), and to better serve the 260,000 Cherokee by forming a tribal credit union and an insurance company, pro-active uses of tribal sovereignty. She wrote the opinion the re-affirmed the Freedmen’s status as Cherokee citizens and wrote the dissent criticizing the petition drive to kick them out.

2) That petition drive was riddled with fraud, “painfully obvious” forgeries and a “conscious and deliberate…disregard for following the law.” Not to mention some of the truly ugly racist attacks that were launched against the Freedmen in the ensuing election.

3) The Tribal Council took just 35 seconds to add another Constitutional Amendment to the June 23rd election in an attempt to keep the Freedmen out, even though all absentee ballots have already been sent out and some have already been returned.

4) Chad Smith accepted a $1,500 donation from Jack Abramoff (in violation of tribal election law). Later, Cherokee Nation Enterprises paid Abramoff $120,000. Read more…