Archive for the ‘Black History Month’ Category

Reading, Writing, ‘Rithmetic

February 27, 2007

ODP Chair Lisa Pryor wrote yesterday on OKBluenotes that if you can read her post on HB 1935, the “Honesty in Funding Education Act,” you should “thank a teacher.”

It is ironic to us that a day later, one of the most poorly written pieces we’ve ever seen on the site was submitted on behalf of Black History Month. In between the run on sentences, poor punctuation, and words that simply don’t belong in context to the sentences, try and interpret this:

BLACK WALL STREET”
“A Dream Lost”

“A little- known chapter of African-American history in Oklahoma as told to Ronald E. Childs. If anyone truly believes that Columbine High School massacre or the on the Federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was the most tragic bombing ever to take place on United States soil as the media has been widely reporting, they’re wrong plain and simple. That’s because an even deadlier bomb occurred in the same state to forget that it ever happened…”

We praised them last week for waiting 14 days to race bait and pander to African American Oklahomans during Black History Month. We guess they wanted to get one more race baiting post on the site before the end of the month.

Reading, Writing, ‘Rithmetic

February 27, 2007

ODP Chair Lisa Pryor wrote yesterday on OKBluenotes that if you can read her post on HB 1935, the “Honesty in Funding Education Act,” you should “thank a teacher.”

It is ironic to us that a day later, one of the most poorly written pieces we’ve ever seen on the site was submitted on behalf of Black History Month. In between the run on sentences, poor punctuation, and words that simply don’t belong in context to the sentences, try and interpret this:

BLACK WALL STREET”
“A Dream Lost”

“A little- known chapter of African-American history in Oklahoma as told to Ronald E. Childs. If anyone truly believes that Columbine High School massacre or the on the Federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was the most tragic bombing ever to take place on United States soil as the media has been widely reporting, they’re wrong plain and simple. That’s because an even deadlier bomb occurred in the same state to forget that it ever happened…”

We praised them last week for waiting 14 days to race bait and pander to African American Oklahomans during Black History Month. We guess they wanted to get one more race baiting post on the site before the end of the month.

Cheap & Patronizing

February 14, 2007

Chairman Pryor has apparently given wide discretion to the new interns when it comes to posting on the official ODP blog, OK Blue Notes. In a seres of “Black History” posts this month, the blog has celebrated the history, accomplishments, and contributions of African Americans to this country. We give them credit for celebrating our history and also waiting 14 days into the month to pander and race bait with a patronizing picture and post on slavery.

Chairman Pryor, we wonder when the below slave ship picture was taken, since the slave trade in the United States was outlawed in 1808, and the first photographic image was created in 1820?

According to Wikipedia:

Through the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 (also known as the Freedom Ordinance) under the Continental Congress, slavery was prohibited in the territories north of the Ohio River. In the East, though, slavery was not abolished until later. The importation of slaves into the United States was banned on January 1, 1808; but not the internal slave trade, or involvement in the international slave trade externally.

The first photograph was an image produced in the 1820s by the French inventor Nicéphore Niépce on a polished pewter plate covered with a petroleum derivative called bitumen of Judea. Produced with a camera, the image required an eight-hour exposure in bright sunshine. Niépce then began experimenting with silver compounds based on a Johann Heinrich Schultz discovery in 1724 that a silver and chalk mixture darkens when exposed to light.

Chairman Pryor, you may want to devote more time to supervising the new interns instead of trying to score points on the radio to later post on the ODP blog.

From OK Blue Notes:

Least we forget….

‘The absence of a permanent memorial to commemorate the lives of the millions of lives lost to the slave trade needs to be addressed’

–The Most Revd Dr John Sentamu, Archbishop of York.

2007 Bicentenary

It is 200 years since Parliament passed the Act to abolish the slave trade in the British Empire – the start of a long road to abolition. The slave trade was a profoundly inhuman enterprise and the bicentenary provides us with an opportunity to express our sorrow that it happened.

It also enables us to remember those who suffered and who campaigned for abolition, and to re-double our efforts to address the legacy of the slave trade and to tackle injustice in the world today.

2007 Bicentenary of the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act: Calendar of Events.